November Weekends at the Seaport: Out to See Festival

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This month at the South Street Seaport, it’s the Out to See festival. Here’s more about the event:

Each weekend the indoor/outdoor market showcases New York City makers, artists, designers, fashion brands and live music. Out to See runs from 11am-5pm Saturdays and Sundays and also includes free concerts, a free photo booth by The Self Portrait Project, 3D-printing workshops and an ice rink. Out to See is organized by miLES (Made in the Lower East Side), curated by miLES, Imagination in Space, 100M Records and presented by Old Seaport Alliance, Howard Hughes Corporation, South Street Seaport Museum, Little Arts Group, Airbnb and Uber. It’s located at Melville Gallery (213 Water St.), Cannon’s Walk and Front St. with more nearby locations being activated by public art – curated by Dept of Cultural Affairs’ Director of Percent for Art Sara Reisman. Just two years after Hurricane Sandy flooded local businesses, Out to See brings more than 50 local entrepreneurs together… Featured NYC startups include Kickstarter sensation Wool and Prince; Toy Syndrome’s 3D-printed fashion; women’s brand One Crown in Glory (Henri Bendel, Town & Country, Today Show); The Makery pop up with 3D scans and prints; New Museum’s NEW INC incubator Airy Light; sustainable fashion from Modavanti; Red Hook’s Tribe Bicycle Co.; New Museum’s NEW INC incubator resident Airy Light; Albert Chao’s Small Smaller Smallest; Etsy New York Team’s handmade crafts; the all-women Damsels in Design and many more… Workshops and experiential activations include The Makery’s 3D scanning and portraits on Nov 8-9 from 11am-5pm; a Makers Workshop from Aktively, S2 Stationers’ card-making workshop; Repast Co’s ravioli-making workshop; Bowne Stationers Printer and more. Out to See’s art component features visual artists from across the city and the Seaport including Nicole Awai, Jane Benson, George Bolster, Emmy Catedral, David Ellis, Tamar Ettun, Mark Gagnon, Elissa Levy, LoVid, Kambui Olujimi, Duke Riley, Michelle Rosenberg and Sean Slaney. The art activates under-utilized spaces like empty storefronts and construction fencing. Curated by Reisman, the exhibitions reflect the Seaport’s history as a place of economic and cultural exchange and its ecological vulnerabilities.

More info here.