L+M Purchases Lands End I, 260-Unit Residential Complex at 257 South St.

257 South St. Image via Emporis.

257 South St. Image via Emporis.

L+M Development Partners, one of the firms building the big Essex Crossing project, is once again expanding its Lower East Side profile. Along with Nelson Management Group, its announcing the purchase of 257-271 South St., a 19-story, federally-subsidized residential building. The purchase price was not disclosed.

The property, known as Lands End I, is a 260-unit development built in 1977 as part of the Two Bridges Urban Renewal Area. In 2013, L+M was part of an ownership group that paid $279 million for Lands End II, a 490-unit complex at 265-275 Cherry St.

A news release states that the 260,000 square foot Lands End 1 was financed by Citi Community Capital:

L+M acquired 257-271 South Street through the NYAH Preservation Fund, a joint real estate private equity platform with Citi Community Capital, which invests in multifamily housing in the New York City metro area, and in conjunction with Nelson Management Group’s Global One Real Estate Fund, which invests in existing value-add and core plus multifamily properties in New York City.

In a statement, L+M’s Eben Ellertson said:

L+M has a substantial commitment to the Lower East Side and we look forward to continuing our efforts to create and sustain quality, mixed-income housing for this special community… Our partnership with Citi has allowed us to strategically invest in the rehabilitation and preservation of thousands of affordable and middle-income units in the New York City area. We are pleased to collaborate with Nelson Management on this project, which will create reliable, sustainable homes and provide first-class property management to current and future generations of residents.

The new owners “plan to make significant capital improvements to the property to reposition the building through common area upgrades, enhanced amenities and apartment renovations, while preserving it as a source of high-quality mixed-income housing in the Lower East Side.”  The press release highlighted the proximity to Essex Crossing, which will begin to rise on nine former urban renewal parcels alongside the Williamsburg Bridge later this year:

The Lower East Side has attracted significant investment in recent years. Located within a ten-minute walk of 257-271 South Street is Essex Crossing, a 1,870,000 square foot mixed-use project that includes residential, office, retail and community space L+M it is co-developing Essex Crossing with Taconic Investment Partners and BFC Partners.

We have contacted tenant leaders in the Two Bridges area for their reaction to the sale. We’ll let you know what we hear.

2 comments to L+M Purchases Lands End I, 260-Unit Residential Complex at 257 South St.

  • Anon resident

    L&M Management are the same awful developer who has left shareholders of coops all around NYC with construction defects. Most notably is the story of the Harlem senior citizen where Donald Capoccia wanted to sue her for millions of dollars for complaining. Yet, they seem unable to fix & maintain their current housing stock, or fix the ongoing construction defects of the coops they have built. So, here they go buying another building that they will destroy. Let’s not this is the same developer who is kicking out ess a bagel out of their location. L&M owner Moelis is also the founder of his own affordable housing institute at NYU.

  • Bowerygals

    President of L&M Capoccia: “A judge has thrown out the lawsuit filed by misanthropic real estate developer Don Capoccia, in which he sued the residents of one of his buildings for complaining about his shoddy construction that resulted in leaking roofs and other structural deficiencies. “- Curbed NY. Co-ops have made similar complaints. Capoccia – Board member of the Real Estate Board NY PAC (along with Extel, Brookfield, Silverstein, and Rudin)….and the ironically named Rent Stabilization Assoc. (representing thousands of landlords), a big campaign donator: Cuomo to Bush to Giuliani…He has a long history here: bulldozed Esperanza Community Garden, built over the Mars bar….inspires great confidence in looking out for those with less financial wherewithal…