Learn About Essex Crossing Jobs at Target, Trader Joe’s, Etc.

Target is one of large-scale businesses that will be part of Essex Crossing. Rendering by Beyer Blinder Belle.

Target and Trader Joe’s are two of the large-scale businesses that will be part of Essex Crossing. Rendering by Beyer Blinder Belle.

Looking for a job on the Lower East Side? You might want to check in on this informational meeting happening tomorrow (Wednesday) at Seward Park High School.

When the big Essex Crossing project finishes its first phase of construction next year, there will be a need to staff up large-scale retail businesses such as Target, Trader Joe’s, Regal Cinema, NYU Langone Health and Splitsville Lanes.

At the meeting, you will hear about the city’s Hire NYC application process and the timeline for hiring. There will also be an overview of the services offered by the Lower East Side Employment Network. Applications will not be distributed at the event.

The meeting takes place tomorrow (Wednesday) 6:30-8 p.m., 350 Grand St. You also might want to sign up for job updates from Essex Crossing.

After 50 Year Wait, First Tenants Moving Into New Apartments on SPURA Site This Week

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It’s been 50 years since the city bulldozed most of the buildings in the Seward Park Urban Renewal Area (SPURA), displacing thousands of local residents. So when the weekly construction update arrived in our in-box this morning from Delancey Street Associates, we took note of this obscure reference, “Residential tenant move-ins will begin Monday, November 13th” on Site 6, the affordable senior building at 175 Delancey St.

That’s right, after five decades, the first residents are moving into Essex Crossing, the large residential and commercial project on the urban renewal site. No ribbon cutting. No marching bands. It’s all happening “below the radar.”

This past spring, there was a housing lottery for the 99 apartments located at 175 Delancey St. Since that time, city officials, Community Board 3 and local non-profits have been helping former tenants of SPURA apply for the affordable units (they have priority status for 50% of the apartments being built). It hasn’t been easy. We have heard about a number of local residents, who decades after their families were displaced, are struggling to get their hands on documentation proving their status as former SPURA tenants.

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At a recent CB3 meeting, City Council member Margaret Chin referenced the Site 6 move-ins. At Grand Street Settlement in the past couple of weeks, she talked with a senior couple, who won the lottery. “They went to see the apartment, and now they’re moving in on Nov. 15th,” noted Chin. Another set of  locals, uprooted from the parcel long ago, told the Council member that they had won a spot in the lottery. “All of us felt it was a moral obligation” to the families who lived on SPURA, she said, “and hearing that some of them have the opportunity to go back to that site is really great.”

A spokesperson for Delancey Street Associates told us today that leasing is continuing for the next several weeks. The goal is to complete the move-in process by the end of the year. A dedication ceremony is in-the-works for January.

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Meanwhile, work is progressing on the commercial spaces at 175 Delancey St.  Grand Street Settlement is planning a soft opening for its GrandLo Cafe on Jan. 16.  The social enterprise business will have its official debut in February or March. NYU Langone Health is working on opening a 55,000 medical center in the building. And the developers recently added signage on Broome and Clinton streets advertising up to 4,000 square feet of retail space in this location. The developers say the space is, “suitable for restaurants.”

Four buildings are included in the first phase of Essex Crossing. When the project is completed, there will be more than 1,000 new apartments, about half of them available at below-market rate rents.

Here’s Your First Look at Essex Crossing’s Affordable Senior Building at 140 Essex St.

Rendering of essex Crossing Site 8/140 Essex St. Architect: Beyer Blinder Belle.

Rendering of Essex Crossing Site 8/140 Essex St. Architect: Beyer Blinder Belle.

The developers of Essex Crossing have now released the first rendering of a new eight-story residential building that will be going up at 140 Essex St.  One of the former Essex Street Market buildings will be demolished to make room for the project. This morning, the development consortium, Delancey street Associates, also announced they have closed on a $34 million construction loan from Wells Fargo.

The building, on Essex Crossing Site 8, will house 92 studio apartments for low-income seniors. In addition to the residential units, 140 Essex St. will also include 9,600 square feet of ground floor retail space. The architect is Beyer Blinder Belle, which also designed Essex Crossing Site 5 at 145 Clinton St.  According to a press release, construction is scheduled to begin in the “coming weeks,” with completion expected in 2019.

The apartments will be available to seniors with annual household incomes at 60% of Area Median Income (about $40,000) and lower.  Five of the project sites are located in the former Seward Park Urban Renewal Area. Three old Essex Street Market buildings, including 140 Essex St., were later added to the mix. Former site tenants, who were evicted in 1967, have priority status in all Essex Crossing housing lotteries.

In addition to the $34 million construction loan, Wells Fargo is the tax credit investor on the project, purchasing Low Income Housing Tax Credits allocated by the NYC Dept. of Housing Preservation and Development.

Delancey Street Associates is made up of BFC Partners, L+M Development Partners, Taconic Investment Partners and Goldman Sachs. In the press release, Margaret Anadu of Goldman Sachs’ Urban Investment Group, noted that the firm has now invested $500 million in Essex Crossing.

Site 8 was originally intended as an 80% market rate/20% affordable condo project, but the expiration of the state’s 421-a tax abatement program prompted a reshuffling of the overall plan. You can read more about those changes here.

The new building is one of two sites devoted to senior housing. The first, located at 175 Delancey St., is expected to open to residents in the next several weeks. Residents of both buildings will have access to a senior center run by Grand Street Settlement at 175 Delancey St.

Essex Crossing will eventually include more than 1,000 apartments (52% affordable), a 14-screen movie theater, a medical center from NYU Langone, a new home for the Essex Street Market and many other amenities. The Essex Street Market remains open at 120 Essex St. in the interim. The building soon to be demolished most recently served as the Lowline Lab.

Essex Crossing Ramps Up Leasing For 350,000 Square Feet of Office Space

Rendering of Essex Crossing site 3 as seen from Broome Street. Image by Moso Studio.

Rendering of Essex Crossing site 3 as seen from Broome Street. Image by Moso Studio.

The developers of Essex Crossing are beginning a big marketing push to lease 350,000 square feet of office space located in two buildings on Delancey Street.

Cushman & Wakefield will serve as brokers for the space, which is set to debut in the year 2020, as part of the large residential/commercial project in the former Seward Park Urban Renewal Area. It will be the first significant block of office space to hit the market on he Lower East Side. For many years, local business leaders have lobbied for commercial development of this type as a way of creating daytime foot traffic for struggling retail businesses.

In September, Delancey Street Associates, the team developing Essex Crossing, released the first renderings of buildings planned in the second phase of their project. The buildings on site 3 and 4 will will include 175,000 square feet of office space each, in addition to apartments on the upper floors and retail below.

In a statement, Charles Bendit of Taconic Investment Partners said, “Today’s most cutting-edge companies – from a range of industries – are looking for ways to differentiate themselves and appeal to a millennial workforce. Essex Crossing’s location, amenities and vibe will make its office space an ideal place for those firms to do something no others have: plant their flag on the LES.”

Josh Kuriloff of Cushman & Wakefield added, “Top firms are increasingly drawn to mixed-use urban campuses because they offer not just new Class A space, but an array of amenities outside the office walls.” Essex Crossing will include a three block-long subterranean shopping pavilion called the Market Line, an expanded Essex Street Market, a medical center run by NYU Langone, a 14-screen movie theater and a new home for the International Center of Photography, among other amenities. The project,  said Kuriloff, is, “strategically suited to welcome office tenants looking to make their mark in the city and give them an upper hand in today’s highly competitive recruitment battle.”

Rendering shows private terrace space. Image by Moso Studio.

Rendering shows private terrace space. Image by Moso Studio.

The offices will be located between Delancey Street and Broome Street, on two sites just to the west of Clinton Street. They will boast private outdoor terraces. The developers are touting easy access to major subway lines and the Williamsburg Bridge, as well as 900 new hotels rooms in the area and 3700 new apartments set for completion in the next few years.

In a story published today, the Wall Street Journal looked at whether Essex Crossing could lead more companies to look at establishing a presence on the Lower East Side:

While the amount of office space is small compared with the commercial skyscrapers of more than a million square feet rising on Manhattan’s far West Side and in the World Trade Center campus, the addition could spur the creation of new office space in a neighborhood where virtually none on this level and scale had existed previously, real-estate executives said. Many point to new office developments sprouting around the once-industrial Meatpacking District as a precedent. “An area like this is not an office area, but if this becomes successful, then others will create opportunities there to develop office space,” said David Falk, president of the New York Tri-State region for real-estate services firm Newmark Knight Frank.

Essex Crossing is a collaboration among Taconic Investment Partners, BFC Partners and L+M Development Partners. The first phase of the project will be finished next year.

 

 

26-Story Essex Crossing Tower at 115 Delancey St. Tops Out

115 Delancey St., Site 2 of Essex Crossing. October 2017. Photo courtesy of Delancey Street Associates.

115 Delancey St., Site 2 of Essex Crossing. October 2017. Photo courtesy of Delancey Street Associates.

Delancey Street Associates, the consortium building Essex Crossing, announced today the topping out of 115 Delancey St. That’s a 26-story residential tower on the southeast corner of Essex and Delancey streets.

In addition to 195 rental apartments, the building will include a new version of the Essex Street Market, the first part of the Market Line shopping pavilion, a 14-screen Regal movie theater and a rooftop farm. The tower, located on site 2 of the former Seward Park Urban Renewal Area, is the tallest in the whole 1.9 million square foot project.

In a statement, Project Manager Isaac Henderson said, “This marks a major milestone for Essex Crossing because in many ways 115 Delancey is our centerpiece.” 115 Delancey was designed by Handel Architects. It is the last of four buildings in the first phase of Essex Crossing to reach its full height. An opening is anticipated in 2018.

The building will include 98 apartments set aside for low- and middle-income families and individuals. The city-sponsored lottery for those affordable units will likely open next month.

Earlier this week, the International Center of Photography announced it would be moving into a 40,000 square foot space on the west side of Essex Street. The first phase of Essex Crossing also includes a 17,000 square foot bowling alley called Splitsville Lanes, a Trader Joe’s, a Target store and a medical center operated by NYU Langone Health.

Late last month, Delancey Street Associates released renderings for sites 3 and 4, which are part of phase 2. The building on site 4 (located at Clinton and Delancey streets) will be 25 stories. Like 115 Delancey St., it is being designed by Handel Architects.

See below for a rendering of 115 Delancey St., plus current photos of the construction site.

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115 Delancey St., Site 2 of Essex Crossing. October 2017.

115 Delancey St., Site 2 of Essex Crossing. October 2017.

International Center of Photography Confirms Plans to Move Museum & School to Essex Crossing

International Center of Photography at Essex Crossing. Rendering by Moso Studio.

International Center of Photography at Essex Crossing. Rendering by Moso Studio.

Now it’s a done deal. Just a few days after sales contracts hit public records, the International Center of Photography (ICP) has confirmed it is moving both its museum and school to Essex Crossing.

ICP will become the cultural anchor of the large residential and commercial complex in the former Seward Park Urban Renewal Area. The 43-year-old institution has agreed to purchase two commercial condominium units, for a total of about 40,000 square feet at 242 Broome St. The facility will include a four-story museum space, which runs straight through between Essex and Ludlow Streets, as well as another 20,000 square feet on the first three fours of an adjoining residential tower.

ICP just moved into a $23.5 million gallery space at 250 Bowery last year. The school will relocate from its longtime home in Midtown. Both facilities will debut in 2019.

Rendering by Moso Studio

Rendering by Gensler.

In a statement, ICP Board President Jeffrey Rosen and Board Chair Caryl Englander said, “We are thrilled to be reuniting the ICP Museum and the ICP School under one roof. This is something towards which we’ve been working for nearly twenty years… It’s gratifying to bring this exciting goal to fruition.” ICP Executive Director Mark Lubell added, “Our Essex venue will continue to reinforce our ties with the vibrant Lower East Side arts community. It enables us to look forward to an exciting future for both ICP and the neighborhood as a whole.”

When the Essex Crossing project was first announced several years ago, the Warhol Museum in Philadelphia was planning to open an annex in the Ludlow Street gallery space. It backed out in 2015. Delancey Street Associates, the development consortium, has been working to find a new cultural tenant. ICP has been interested in the space for a long time, but needed to raise the necessary funds to make the move happen.

“Aligning our cultural goals with the Lower East Side’s burgeoning arts scene wasn’t a simple task,” said Paul Pariser, of Taconic Investment Partners. “We wanted to find a world-class institution, but also an organization that would be accessible to the community, from practicing artists to schoolchildren and their families. ICP will deliver that rare blend to the LES, and really help make Essex Crossing the beating cultural heart of the neighborhood.”

The building at 242 Broome St. also includes 55 condominium apartments and a 17,000 square foot bowling alley/entertainment complex called Splitsville Lanes. The residential portion of the building will open in 2018, along with three other Essex Crossing sites.  The building was designed by SHoP Architects. ICP has hired the design firm, Gensler, to work on the interior spaces.

ICP will continue to offer classes at its Midtown location until June of 2019. The school serves around 3500 students each year.

Essex Crossing is a collaboration among Taconic Investment Partners, BFC Partners and L+M Development Partners.

 

International Center of Photography Signs Contract For Essex Crossing Spaces

Original rendering of Essex Crossing/Warhol Museum space.

Original rendering of Essex Crossing/Warhol Museum space.

Construction crews are racing to finish the first phase of Essex Crossing next year. Hundreds of apartments, a 14-screen movie theater, an NYU ambulatory care center and a Trader Joe’s are all part of the huge development project. But one question still remains just a few months from opening day: Who will occupy a 15,000 square foot cultural space at 242 Broome St.?

During the past couple of years, the International Center of Photography (ICP) has been weighing whether to establish a new museum in the Essex Crossing complex, and whether to relocate its school from Midtown Manhattan. Now there’s a new clue about ICP’s intentions.  Commercial Observer reports:

The 43-year-old institution signed a contract to purchase two commercial condominium units—one retail unit and one community facility unit—in the base of the residential condo tower at 242 Broome Street, according to public records.

A check of the NYC Department of Finance database shows that ICP signed a contract for the condo units with Delancey Street Associates (the development consortium) on Oct. 3. A spokesperson for the development team declined to comment. Commercial Observer contacted ICP, but there was no response. There is, of course, a big difference between signing an agreement to purchase a property and actually acquiring the property. So it’s not a done deal yet.

ICP currently has a museum space at 250 Bowery. The institution has been looking  to move its school and administrative offices, currently located at 1114 Sixth Avenue. Back in January, ICP Executive Director Mark Lubell told us the move to Essex Crossing was dependent on the success of a capital campaign. At the time, he said he expected the board of directors to make a decision no later than the summer of this year.

The Essex Crossing museum space sits just to the north of a 14-story condo tower at 242 Broome St. There are four levels set aside for commercial space in the residential building. This past spring, Curbed toured the construction site. The real estate blog reported, “The cultural center will be separated from the main structure by what the architects call ‘Soho Stairs’—a long, vertical, continuous flight of stairs that can be used to access the different floors of the institution.”

The Essex Crossing cultural facility was originally going to be an annex of the Warhol Museum, but the Pittsburgh-based institution backed out of the project in 2015.

New Renderings Released For Essex Crossing Sites 3 and 4

Site 3 (left) and Site 4 of Essex Crossing; view from Delancey Street. Rendering by Moso Studio.

Site 3 (left) and Site 4 of Essex Crossing; view from Delancey Street. Rendering by Moso Studio.

A couple of renderings showing the second phase of Essex Crossing have just been released.

The first phase, including four buildings in the old Seward Park Urban Renewal Area, is nearing completion. Now Delancey Street Associates, the development consortium, is offering the first look at buildings coming to sites 3 and 4.

That’s site 4 on the left side of the image posted above. The 25-story building at 180 Broome St. was designed by Handel Architects. It’s located between Suffolk and Clinton streets and will include a 50/50 mix of market rate and affordable rental apartments.

In the middle is site 3, 202, Broome St., a 14-story building that will house 83 market rate condos. It was designed by CetraRuddy Architects.

 Rendering by Moso Studio.

Rendering by Moso Studio.

Here’s a view from Broome Street. In the foreground, you see a 15,000 square foot publicly accessible park that’s part of phase one. The subterranean levels of sites 2, 3 and 4 include the Market Line, a large food and retail pavilion. The buildings will also include 400,000 square feet of office space.

Essex Crossing will include 1,078 residential units, 52% affordable to low- and middle-income families. There’s also 450,000 square feet of retail, including a new home for the Essex Street Market.

The renderings were first published this morning by Curbed.

Essex Crossing Developers Seek Proposals For 220-Foot Mural

Image shows western facade of Essex Crossing Site 5.

Image shows western facade of Essex Crossing Site 5.

The developers of Essex Crossing are seeking proposals for a gigantic mural to be created on the facade of 145 Clinton St.

That’s one of four buildings under construction in the first phase of the project. The mural could be as long as 220 feet. It will be located on the western side of Essex Crossing Site 5. Proposals are being accepted from both emerging and established artists.

In a statement, Don Capoccia of BFC Partners said, “The Lower East Side’s street art legacy is as rich as any neighborhood in the city, so we’re hoping to both honor and continue that tradition though this mural… We’re eager to see submissions that really speak to the artistic heritage of the LES.” BFC, L+M Development Partners and Taconic Investment Partners make up Delancey Street Associates, the consortium building the 1.9 million square foot project in the former Seward Park Urban Renewal Area.

More submission information is available here.

In this building, there will be 211 rental apartments, half of them affordable. Market rate leasing is expected to begin later this year. The large wall, near Suffolk St., is adjacent to the site of a future public school. The school has not been funded by the city and state, meaning construction is years away, if it happens at all.

Street art is a theme running through the Essex Crossing project. In June, the developers partnered with LES street artist Hanksy for a show inside a former Essex Street Market building which will soon be demolished for affordable senior housing. One of the buildings in the Market Line, an underground facility in the Essex Crossing complex, will be reserved for galleries, performance spaces and other creative ventures.  According to a press release,  “Delancey Street Associates is also working with LES street artists to facilitate large-scale installations within the Market Line and at several exterior locations.”

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Plans Filed For Essex Crossing Building at 202 Broome St.

Screen grab from Essex Crossing Interactive Map.

Screen grab from Essex Crossing Interactive Map. 202 Broome St. is the third building from the right.

The City of New York and the developers of Essex Crossing are taking the next steps in building the large project in the former Seward Park Urban Renewal Area. As The Real Deal noted yesterday, plans have been filed for a 15-story residential/commercial building at 202 Broome St. (between Norfolk and Suffolk streets).

The building, located on project site 3, will include 83 market rate condo units, part of the Market Line shopping pavilion and four floors for offices. Approximately 154,000 square feet have been set aside for commercial use on this site. The condo units begin on the 7th floor. CetraRuddy is the architect of record.

Delancey Street Associates, the development consortium, will complete construction next year on the first four buildings. The first phase will include more than half of the 1,078 apartments in the project, as well as a new Essex Street Market, a 14-screen Regal movie theater, a medical center from NYU Langone, a Trader Joe’s supermarket, a Target store and a bowling alley complex called Splitsville Lanes.

202 Broome St. was originally slated to be a mixed-income rental building. Delays in resuscitating a version of the state’s 421-a tax incentive program prompted the developers to change plans. The site 3 building is now 100% market rate, while a building at 140 Essex St. (site 8) will include 92 studio apartments for low-income seniors. Site 4, at 180 Broome St., will be a 25-story building with mixed-income rental housing and more office space. In total, 52% of the apartments in the Essex Crossing project are considered affordable.

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The Market Line. Rendering by SHoP Architects.

The Market Line is a large subterranean space running below sites 2, 3 and 4. The first phase is set to debut on Essex Street in the fall of 2018. When the second phase of the project is complete in 2021, the full Market Line will be open for business. The small-format retail complex is meant to complement the Essex Street Market and will be food-focused, but also include artisans, clothing designers and other independent retail concepts.

Essex Crossing is a partnership among Taconic Investment Partners, L+M Development Partners and BFC Partners. The initial plans for 202 Broome St. were filed by the city’s Department of Housing Preservation and Development. The developers will not take ownership of the site until shortly before construction begins.

Vision For New Essex Street Market Comes Into Sharper Focus

Rendering: Essex Street Market.

Rendering: Essex Street Market.

When the first phase of Essex Crossing opens next year, nearly everything about the large development project will, of course, be brand new. One exception is the 77-year-old Essex Street Market, which is moving to an expanded space on the south side of Delancey Street. Whether the beloved public facility feels connected to its Lower East Side roots will help determine whether the larger residential and commercial development is embraced by the local community.

At a recent meeting of Community Board 3, city officials began to lay out a vision for the new market, which is expected to open at 115 Delancey St. in September of 2018. The presentation was led by David Hughes, vice president and executive director of markets for the city’s Economic Development Corp. (EDC)

As The Lo-Down first reported in April, the EDC, along with the Essex Street Market Vendor Association and the Lower East Side Partnership struck a deal for operating the new facility after years of negotiations. During the community board meeting, Hughes outlined what he called, “a kind of collaborative, hybridized management structure that I think really addresses the needs of this market.”

The city will continue to own and run the facility, while both the vendor association and the Partnership will take on expanded responsibilities for marketing, community relations and programming. The EDC is providing the LES Partnership with funding for a full-time manager to oversee market events and outreach in the neighborhood. The EDC is also extending an existing contract for a part-time staffer working directly with the vendors on special programs and social media. Hughes said the city will bring on an outside contractor to handle maintenance at the new market. The final piece of the puzzle is a community advisory committee, which will offer local feedback to the management team.

Essex Street Market, April 2017.

Essex Street Market, April 2017.

All 28 vendors will be making the move from the current building at 120 Essex St. “They have had their new stalls designed according to their specs,” said Hughes. Delancey Street Associates, the Essex Crossing development consortium, is paying to build the new facility and is covering the vendors’ moving costs. 

As previously reported, there will be two stand-alone restaurants in the Essex Street Market. The city is accepting proposals for those spaces. The EDC is also seeking to add 11 new small-format vendors, and an outside consultant, Robert LaValva, has been hired to help with recruitment. LaValva, the founder of the New Amsterdam Market, is a well-known figure in the New York City food world and a passionate advocate for the city’s public markets, past and present.

“There are things currently missing from Essex Street Market’s lineup,” said Hughes. “Wine, a good sandwich shop, perhaps, flowers, pickles. There are things that we have to actually go after and find and fill those vacancies.” Another goal, he explained, is to recruit local small businesses to join the market, as well as small start-ups. 

New Essex Street Market under construction.

New Essex Street Market under construction.

mezzanine level looking west

The new market covers 37,000 square feet, as opposed to 10,000 square feet in the current 1940s-era building. “There’s a lot more potential and opportunity for programming and events in this new space,” said Hughes. On the mezzanine, there will be a demonstration kitchen and flexible public gathering space. The mezzanine will be used for a wide range of programs, including cooking classes, workshops, talks, etc. Many events will be free, while other ticketed programs will help generate revenue for the market. The 6,000 square foot mezzanine will be available for rent by outside groups.

The city has hired WXY Studio, a design and planning firm, to help reposition the new Essex Street Market. As Hughes put it, “We have an opportunity now to rebrand, to think about who we are.” One developing idea is to use old photos and iconic signage from the historic market to draw a link between the past and present. While Hughes said the market is and always will be geared for the local community, he added, “We’re leveraging tourism connections. We’re thinking above and beyond the local community. We need to bring in other people. We want this market to be a draw. We want it to be like Reading Terminal Market (Philadelphia). You want it to be a destination.”

Rendering: Early idea for new Essex Street Market signage.

Rendering: Early idea for new Essex Street Market signage.

After several Essex Street Market businesses shuttered in 2015, vendors were sharply critical of EDC management, and called on the city to hand over daily operations to an outside not-for-profit organization. That didn’t happen, but the EDC did agree to delegate some responsibilities to the Partnership and the Vendor Association. The community board also stepped in, calling on the city to address to vendors’ concerns about the new facility. At last week’s meeting, Partnership President Tim Laughlin said the city clearly rose to the challenge.

“I think what the community board and the vendor association asked for happened,” he said. “Number one, get someone who’s experienced and gets markets in charge of the portfolio (David Hughes, former head of the Union Square Greenmarket was hired). Make sure the vendors are moving over to a new state-of-the-art facility with no problems. Make sure we have a long-term road map (for operating the market).”  Laughlin argued, “EDC has gone above and beyond what the community board requests were and what our requests were, and I think they deserve a lot of credit. We’re excited to open a facility that is truly going to be a one-of-a-kind community asset.”

In an interview, Vendor Association Chairperson Anne Saxelby also offered encouraging words for the new management arrangement. “I definitely feel positive about the new market,” said Saxelby. It has taken a long time to get here (after many months of negotiations),” she added, “but I think we’re finally in a good spot, and I think the vendors are excited about the move and about the new space.”

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Back in 2011, many local advocates, including Saxelby, fought a losing battle to save the original Essex Street Market building. That fight, however, was over long ago. Now the vendors and many locals are focused on making sure the new market retains its soul in a shiny new home. One drawback of the current historic building is that people walking by cannot see the businesses located inside. The new building, with its glass facade, will offer vendors good street-side visibility. Saxelby said most vendors, who have struggled in the years since the Essex Crossing project was announced, are looking forward to the boost that a new home will hopefully bring.

The new market will serve as a companion to another Essex Crossing amenity, a large subterranean shopping pavilion known as the Market Line. It will begin in the space below the Essex Street Market and extend over three development parcels to the east. There are some fears that the historic market’s unique identity will be subsumed by the Market Line. Both city officials and Essex Crossing developers tell us, however, they’re determined to keep that from happening.

A spokesperson for EDC said the city sees the Market Line as a, “great partner in our common purpose of providing quality food to the Lower East Side community.” But at the same time, “Essex Street Market will continue to be its own, distinct entity given that it is a mission-driven public market with a defined civic purpose. The goal of Essex Street Market will continue to be supporting small businesses and encouraging entrepreneurship, providing access to affordable, fresh food, and preserving the cultural tradition of public markets as strong community hubs with curated events and free programming in a safe and engaging public space. ”

Rohan Mehra of the Prusik Group, part of Delancey Street Associates, agreed. Referring to the Essex Street Market and the Market Line, he said, “they are distinct entities.” Explaining that the nearly 80-year-old Lower East Side market was, “our inspiration,” Mehra said the new small format retail center is intended to complement the Essex Street Market. “The idea,” he said, “is that between (the two markets), both located in one of the most diverse places in New York City, that shoppers can find anything imaginable, at all price points.” Mehra added that the focus of the Market Line, like the Essex Street Market, is on serving the local community. He acknowledged a need to attract shoppers from outside the neighborhood, but explained, “our feeling has always been that if the local community shops there, everyone else will go there, too. Tourists are looking for local flavor, history, character. If we are inclusive, the rest will follow.”

Construction of the new Essex Street Market is expected to be completed by June of next year. The vendors will make the move across Delancey Street in the fall. The developers and city officials have promised that the move will be seamless. The market will remain open until the debut of the new facility.

Anne Saxelby said she hopes local residents will continue to patronize the market in the months remaining before the move. “I’m really excited,” she told us.  “It’s a great opportunity to grow our businesses. I would just encourage people in the neighborhood to keep supporting the market and we’ll get through this transition together!” 

 

CB3:Essex Street Market Presentation by The Lo-Down on Scribd

A First Look at the New Essex Street Market; City Seeks Two New Restaurants

essex street market 2

A year before the scheduled move of the Essex Street Market into a new home in the Essex Crossing project, city officials are going public with a few details about the new facility. The Economic Development Corp. (EDC) yesterday announced it is accepting applications for two new restaurants and 11 smaller vendors to be part of the expanded public market. We’re also getting our first look at renderings and floor plans.

All of the existing (28) vendors will be moving across the street to 115 Delancey St., on the first two levels of a building that will also include a 14-screen movie theater and rental apartments. The EDC is looking for two restaurant operators for spaces that each measure about 1100 square feet. According to a press release, the city seeks, “independent, locally-based restaurateurs or restaurant groups who are interested in using farm-to-table seasonal produce or other regional foods on their menus.” They will have their own entrances (on Delancey and Broome streets), built into the new façade of the market.”

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The existing vendors have already chosen their locations in the new facility. According to a floor plan, additional spaces are available ranging from 87 square feet to 534 square feet. More information and application materials are available here.

The new market is supposed to open in June of next year and the current market will remain operational up until that time. The ground floor covers 30,000 square feet (about twice the size of the current facility). There’s also a 6,000 square foot mezzanine. There will be a demonstration kitchen for catered events and public classes.  There will also be a “late night zone” for merchants who wish to stay open until 8 p.m. Right now, the whole facility shuts down at 7 p.m.

essex street market 3

essex street market 1

In yesterday’s press release, Vendor Association Chair Anne Saxelby of Saxelby Cheesemongers, said, “I am thrilled about the move to a new space… The market is a Lower East Side institution, and in a city where the retail landscape is becoming ever more homogenized, it’s so exciting to see the expansion and continuation of this unique and diverse community of small businesses. It’s markets like Essex that make New York great!”

Lower East Side Partnership President Tim Laughlin added, “We are excited to partner with NYCEDC to ensure the market continues to thrive and grow supporting existing vendors and welcoming new ones in a state-of-the-art facility; this unique opportunity allows the market to continue supporting a diverse collection of small and independent merchants for many years to come.”

As we reported in April, the Vendor Association, the LES Partnership and the EDC recently came to terms on an agreement for operating the new market. While the EDC will continue to manage the facility, the vendors and the Partnership will take on more responsibilities in marketing and running the market on a day-to-day basis.

The new Essex Street Market is meant to complement a subterranean shopping pavilion known as the Market Line, a major feature of the Essex Crossing mixed-use development. The Market Line will begin directly below the Essex Street Market, eventually extending to the east in two buildings that will be constructed during phase 2 of the project.

Here’s How a Big Box Retailer, Target, Ended Up at Essex Crossing

Essex Crossing Site 5. Rendering by Beyer Blinder Belle.

Essex Crossing Site 5. Rendering by Beyer Blinder Belle.

As the whole neighborhood knows by now, a Target store is coming to Essex Crossing (145 Clinton St.). Many people are dismayed about the arrival of a big box (technically medium box) store on the Lower East Side. Others are looking forward to the convenience of a local Target. Since the news broke on Sunday, readers have been asking, “Didn’t the Seward Park development plan prohibit big box stores?” Here’s the answer to that question.

The subject of big box retail was a point of contention during years of community board deliberations over the formerly city-owned sites. Most community members were strongly opposed to chain stores and large corporate stores.

The Request for Proposals (RFP) that went out in 2012 compelled developers to establish at least two distinct storefronts in ground floor spaces along Delancey Street. Three storefronts were required on Broome Street. An exception was made for a grocery store (the project includes a 30,000 square foot Trader Joe’s below-grade at 145 Grand St.) The provisions effectively forced larger retailers to the second or third floors of some buildings. But the restrictions did not cover Grand and Clinton streets.

A section of the RFP titled, “Community Priorities” placed a limit of 30,000 square feet on retail establishments. As we reported in September of 2012, the city would not budge on this point, refusing to insert the provision into the main body of the RFP.  In a community board meeting earlier that year, a city official said a project with only small-scale retail was not “sustainable.” The official, David Quart, said an “anchor tenant” was essential to the success of the project. Quart said the idea was to attract a good mix of retail businesses – some small, some large – offering a diversity of products at various price points.

Years later a 22,500 square foot Target on the second floor is part of Essex Crossing. The project, of course, also includes the Market Line, a 150,000 square foot public market made up of mostly micro-retailers. Most of the large spaces in the first phase of development are already claimed, so it’s unlikely we’ll see more big box retail when the first buildings open next year. The second and third phases of the project? That’s another story.

A spokesperson for the development team says they actually went beyond the requirements of the RFP. A 65,000 square foot movie theater (an amenity the community requested) is located on the second and third floors of a building on Site 2 of the project.  The grocery could have been placed on the main floor but is instead in a basement space.

Target is Coming to Essex Crossing; 22,500 SF Store Slated For 145 Clinton St. (Updated)

Target will be located on the second floor of 145 Clinton St. Rendering by Beyer Blinder Belle.

Target will be located on the second floor of 145 Clinton St. Rendering by Beyer Blinder Belle.

Target announced today it is opening a store in the Essex Crossing project on the Lower East Side.

The 22,500 square foot, “small format” urban store will be located on the second floor of a building now under construction at 145 Clinton St. The mixed-use building will also include a 30,000 square foot Trader Joe’s grocery store.

A Target spokesperson told the Wall Street Journal that the big box retailer “sees tremendous potential” in the New York City market. Full-size Target stores are often well over 100,000 square feet. The small format concept (ranging from 12,000-60,000 sf) had 32 locations at the end of 2016, the Journal reported. A rapid expansion of the smaller stores is planned during the next couple of years.

The Lower East Side Target store will be taking the place of Planet Fitness, which backed out of Essex Crossing after announcing in the fall of 2015 it would be coming to the 1.9 million square foot complex.

The first phase of Essex Crossing, on four sites, will be completed next year. In total, the project will bring more than 1,000 apartments, retail, office space and community facilities to the former Seward Park Urban Renewal Area. It is being built by Delancey Street Associates, a joint venture of L+M Development Partners, BFC Partners, Taconic Investment Partners and the Prusik Group.

UPDATE 5/1/2017 A few more details from a press release put out last night by Delancey Street Associates:

S. Andrew Katz of the Prusik Group said, “Throughout the planning process, the community made clear that a quality, affordable apparel and home goods retailer was a top priority for the neighborhood; we made a commitment to deliver that… With Target, Trader Joe’s, Splitsville Luxury Lanes, Regal Cinemas and NYU Langone’s medical center all slated to open next year, 2018 will be a banner year for Essex Crossing’s commercial spaces and really bring the site to life for the community.”

The Lower East Side location will be Target’s fourth store in Manhattan. The company already has stores in Harlem and Tribeca. A location in Herald Square is scheduled to open this coming fall. Target has announced plans for small format stores on East 14th Street and Hell’s Kitchen.

The LES store is expected to include: food and beverage items; health and beauty “brands most relevant to the diverse guest;” clothing and accessories for both young professionals and children; stationery and home items “dedicated to refreshing small living spaces;” and a CVS Pharmacy.

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Agreement Reached For Operating New Essex Street Market at Essex Crossing

Essex Crossing rendering by Handel Architects.

Essex Crossing rendering by Handel Architects.

A little more than a year from now, in the summer of 2018, a newly expanded Essex Street Market is expected to open at 115 Delancey St. It is part of the big Essex Crossing project now under construction. Earlier this week it was announced that an issue looming over the new facility, the relationship between the Vendor Association and the city, has finally been resolved.

At Tuesday evening’s meeting of Community Board 3, Gigi Li, who chairs the Essex Crossing Task Force, said a preliminary agreement is now in place for operations at the new market. The tentative deal is the result of more than three years of talks involving the Economic Development Corp. (EDC), which oversees the market, the Vendor Association and the Lower East Side Partnership, which coordinates marketing efforts on behalf of the vendors.

In a report to CB3 members, Li said, “I believe that all of the asks (requests) that we had as guidelines… in the project were met.” She added that the “agreement will be further fleshed out to include staff and structure, funding, allocations, as well as all roles and responsibilities (of each partner).” The details of the agreement will not be revealed until July, when the city presents the plan at a meeting of CB3’s economic development committee.

Essex Street Market, April 2017.

Essex Street Market, April 2017.

The new home of the Essex Street Market is under construction on the southeast corner of Essex and Delancey streets.

The new home of the Essex Street Market is under construction on the southeast corner of Essex and Delancey streets.

During the past few years, Anne Saxelby head of the Vendor Association, has been a vocal critic of the way the city runs the market. Several merchants were forced to close their stalls due to dwindling foot traffic. The vendors complained of lackluster marketing to help boost business. Then the EDC brought the Partnership in to help with marketing and provided funding to the Vendor Association for a part-time coordinator. In briefing CB3 last summer, Saxelby was a lot more optimistic, saying improvements (such as bright new interior and exterior murals and a series of public events) had make a big difference. At the same time, she continued to call on the city to hand over operations of the new market to an outside not-for-profit organization.

While all parties have declined to discuss the terms of the agreement, a spokesperson for the EDC signaled yesterday that the city would continue to oversee the Essex Street Market, while the LES Partnership and the Vendor Association would take on larger roles.

LES Partnership President Tim Laughlin said in a statement, “We look forward to continuing a close partnership with NYCEDC, market vendors and other community stakeholders to ensure the new market facility remains accessible and provides and array of community benefits. We are finalizing the extension of agreements that expand the coordinated role that the Partnership and Essex Street Market Vendor Association have played in supporting the market and it’s diverse collection of vendors.”

In the past year, the EDC created a new position, Vice President-Executive Director of Markets, to oversee all of the city’s public market facilities. In September, David Hughes, the longtime manager of the Union Square Greenmarket, was hired in that role. His involvement means EDC is better equipped to deal with the intricacies of operating the historic Lower East Side facility at a time of unprecedented change.

The new Essex Street Market will be part of the larger Market Line, a 150,000 square foot retail pavilion at Essex Crossing. The Market Line will be run by Delancey Street Associates, the developers building the mixed-use project. Meanwhile, the Essex Street Market will be city-operated.

In keeping with an agreement struck with the city years ago, all of the vendors in the current market will move across the street to the new facility. They’ll pay the same rent at Essex Crossing that they’re paying at the time the move takes place. There are currently 25 merchants (with two new vendors opening soon). The 14,000 square foot facility will double in size when the new market debuts next year.