L Train Closure Set For April 27

Canarsie Tunnel. MTA Photo.

Canarsie Tunnel. MTA Photo.

The MTA and the city’s Department of Transportation have announced that the L Train shutdown will begin on April 27. Details of note from yesterday’s press release:

The l tunnel will close for its 15-month reconstruction on Saturday, April 27, 2019. This means that the last day for l service between 8th Av and Bedford Av in Brooklyn will be Friday, April 26, 2019. l train service will continue throughout Brooklyn, between the Bedford Av station, which will remain open during the tunnel closure, and the Canarsie-Rockaway Parkway station.

The alternative service options for customers, which includes five additional bus routes, a new M14 Select Bus Service on 14th Street and a ferry service, will begin on Sunday, April 21, 2019, to allow for customers to sample and become acclimated to new travel options. The additional subway service on other lines – more than 1,000 additional roundtrips – will begin on April 28, 2019, following the l tunnel closure.

Customers will be able to meet in person with MTA NYC Transit and NYCDOT team members to plan their routes, through a series of open houses, pop-up events or one of the three mobile information centers – two vans and a bus – which will make stops to meet with customers. Official dates and times for open houses and schedules for events and the mobile information center locations will be posted on the L tunnel reconstruction website once announced.

Officials are committing to monitor the air for particulates typically caused by diesel emissions, known as PM2.5, and making results publicly available. This is in addition to the air quality monitoring already in place for the project’s construction sites.

Streetsblog noted in its coverage yesterday:

…DOT Commissioner Polly Trottenberg called the Williamsburg Bridge a “bus bridge” in her statement. (Alas, we checked with DOT to see if the agency had scrapped its inevitably ill-fated decision to allow cars with three or more people to cross the bridge instead of setting it aside entirely for public transit — but a spokesman said the HOV-3 plan remains in effect. Well, we’ll see if the city can really run 80 buses per peak hour with cars mixed in…)

You can see the full plan here.